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The Sex Doll: Its Origins and Functions

Link to this post 24 Oct 19

Upon requesting this title from Library Thing's Early Reviewer program, I was nervous that author Anthony Ferguson's discussion of Sex Dolls would present a view largely uncritical of these increasingly popular sexual aids and, more importantly, their owners/users. (So much so that I was actually relieved when the first copy was lost in the mail!) Happily, Ferguson (a member of the Australian Horror Writers Association - a detail that seems only slightly less odd in light of chapter eleven, which turns to dolls as a common trope in the horror genre!) manages to outline the potential anti-feminist implications of TPE Sex Doll while retaining empathy for (at least some of) their users. All in all, the book manages to find middle ground, even if it is at times shaky.

In chapter seven, "Sex Doll Stereotypes," Ferguson analyzes sex dolls- objectified, silent and subservient (representations of) women, the "perfect" partners, if you will - in relation to their human counterparts, namely sex workers such as prostitutes and pornographic actors, as well as other sexually exploitable women, including mail order brides and mistresses. Since each of these topics could easily fill its own volume, the discussion is necessarily brief and lacking in nuance. Rather than add to my understanding of sex dolls, I found this chapter in particular a distraction.

"Given that sex dolls are as of now still inanimate objects, they are understandably treated as lacking autonomy, and yet they represent real women and are utilized as substitutes for real women. Despite the fact that some sex doll owners seem to treat their dolls with affection and anthropomorphize them, it is the dolls' inability to respond, react or reject which most attracts men. This objectification is mirrored historically in the treatment of women, the `thing' most dolls represent."

Ferguson is at his best when looking at representations of sex dolls in popular culture, as he does in chapters ten and eleven ("Do Androids Dream of Electric Orgasm?" and "Revulsion, Lust and Love," respectively). His discussion of sex dolls and gynoids (female robots) in literature, film, television, music and art is by far the most engaging section of THE SEX DOLL - although his omission of the Cylons in the BATTLESTAR GALACTICA reboot is disappointing at best. (Particularly since it's in these chapters that Ferguson introduces the question of human-robot love and marriage. Caprica Six! Athena! Hera!) Additionally, while the Terminator franchise is mentioned in brief, Ferguson fails to examine the evolving representations of the cyborgs in this realm; i.e., the possibility of a romantic and sexual relationship with a terminator is only raised when the female cyborg Cameron is introduced in THE SARAH CONNOR CHRONICLES. This observation might have provided a nice window into the gender dynamics of sex dolls, and how they're reflected in popular culture.


SLDolls Website https://sldolls.com